Tag Archive: non-geographical number

When is a phone not a phone? When it’s a Playstation

February 14, 2011 11:05 am | Leave your thoughts | Written by

Sony Xperia PlaySo, Sony has unveiled its new Xperia Play handset, which is more commonly known as the ‘Playstation Phone’, at the Mobile World Congress 2011 in Barcelona.

Everyone is talking about the four-inch multitouch screen and a slide out PlayStation-style controller not to mention the graphics processor and promise of “silky smooth 3D mobile gaming”.

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Case Study

August 12, 2010 2:41 pm | Leave your thoughts | Written by

Small Business Start Up Case StudyCase Study

City slickers Martin and Theresa decided to up tools and start a new life on the East Coast of England. Previously having administration roles they both decided to take the plunge and start up two new businesses, one each.

Martin, who was a landscape gardener by trade, had always dreamed of having his own gardening business. He began by ordering business cards incorporating the home telephone number, advertising his services as gardener and handyman.

Theresa, who had begun trading as a holistic therapist did the same, as well as using the line to receive incoming house calls.

Theresa was intending to work from her office in the house which meant she would be at home to answer any calls that were made during Martin’s working hours. Although Martin’s mobile was an accessible tool, his working hours and demands meant he may miss calls at times.

The businesses gathered momentum at a much quicker pace than either of them expected. Incoming calls to the house phone were indistinguishable, meaning Theresa had to answer the phone with a simple “hello.” As the first point of customer contact the impression is less than professional, causing the company to sound small and underdeveloped. It is then left with the customer to identify themselves instead of the company identifying its services.

There was also the problem that Theresa would have to leave the house to carry out errands, or if she was with a client she would not be able to answer the phone.

Martin and Theresa’s client bases were also very different from those in the city. Being a more rural environment, they did not feel as though a complicated telecommunication package would be the answer.

08 Direct were able to offer them simple solutions without complicated installation and expensive equipment:

Non Geographical Number

By giving them a non geographical number which sits on top of their existing phone line, both businesses were able to benefit from free 08 numbers, increasing company presence and providing a more memorable number for their businesses.

Call Whisper

By applying call whisper to their non geographical number they were able to distinguish between business calls. For example, “This is a call for Martin’s Landscape Gardening, press one to accept.” This allows both businesses to use the same telephone number but be able to answer the call according to the service provided.

Follow Me Routing

08 Direct’s follow me routing service means that the business line will ring three times, if unanswered the call will be diverted to Martin or Theresa’s mobile. If the call still cannot be answered, a voicemail will activate to record a message for further action.

Voicemail

Voicemail after a preset number of rings means that potential clients are always given the ability to leave details and receive call backs.

These services not only benefit the companies as they start out but will continue to support them in their success. Their non geographical number and additional free services can stay with them for life, through expansion, office moves or increases in members of staff. One number will still be able to provide all their communication needs.

What Makes a Good Call Centre UK?

August 12, 2010 9:40 am | Leave your thoughts | Written by

uk based call centresHaving a strong product range, snazzy website and telephone infrastructure is a great way to increase response rates…..but what makes the sale and keeps customers coming back…..? What makes a good call centre UK?

So, you have developed your business, employed new staff members and have your free non geographical number set up. Customer service has always been a priority but with increased call volume you want to make sure call quality continues.

What makes a good call centre UK?

Call Centre UK – Staff Training

By preparing staff to answer questions they will be more confident and efficient in their response. Many companies create good practice by informing staff on the most frequently asked questions and the best and most efficient ways to answer them. The customer will feel more confident when dealing with team members that are not hesitant and able to respond to them quickly and efficiently. Make sure employees are able to answer all queries so the call does not get passed between staff members, leaving the customer feeling unvalued.

Call Centre UK – Know Your Customer

Train staff members to know the customer on the other end of the line, maybe note their age, gender and name. Simple forms of information can enable a customer to be linked to the correct product. Tailor your product to your customer, not your customer to your product.

Call Centre UK – Feedback

Give staff members feedback in regards to sales and achievements. By understanding company growth people can understand their role in working towards its success. Targets to achieve on a monthly basis will help people work towards a common goal.

Call Centre UK – Know Your Products

All staff should be familiar with products, services and branding.  A customer should never ask a question about a product that cannot be answered. This could cause a lack of confidence in your company and lead to a reduction in sales.

Call Centre UK – Reputation

By treating your customers fairly, considerately and as a person rather than a sales lead you will develop a strong reputation for good customer service. Reputation means a lot in terms of company image and can be the difference between retaining customers, losing customers and gaining customers.